Speaking surreptitiously into a cell phone, we described the movements of a male and female couple performing Tino Sehgal’s Kiss at the Guggenheim Museum in March 2010. This action generated a 12-minute audio score.

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1. A dancer puts on a set of headphones in which s/he hears our audio score for Kiss. The dancer’s task is to simultaneously re-speak the score into a microphone. The microphone also captures the slurs, slips, and mistakes made while performing this task.

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2. H/er voice now played back and amplified in the space, the dancer from operation 1 performs a literal interpretation in movement of the score, enacting both male and female roles on h/er own body.
In another part of the space, a second dancer emerges from the audience, approaches a microphone, and puts on a set of headphones. As in operation 1, the second dancer’s task is to simultaneously re-speak the score into a microphone, which records but does not amplify h/er voice.

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3. Layered on top of one another, the two recordings made by both dancers are played back and amplified in the space. They perform simultaneous solos, each a literal interpretation in movement of the audio score and an enactment of both male and female roles.
Meanwhile, in another part of the space, a third dancer emerges from the audience, approaches a microphone, puts on a set of headphones, and repeats operation 1.

00:36-00:48
4. With the score now heard as an overlay of three voices, the third dancer joins the other two to perform a trio of simultaneous solos. A fourth dancer approaches a microphone and observes the movements of the other three. H/er task is to describe the choreography of this trio. This action generates a new 12-minute score.

00:48-00:60
5. The newly created score is played back and amplified in the space. The score is performed as a duet watched by two other dancers. As a duet, the dancers negotiate the roles they hear in the score while each dancer watching the duet makes a notation of the duet’s choreography as he sees it. The four dancers change parts over the course of the twelve minutes. This operation generates two new scores recorded in each of the two microphones.

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6. A recording from one of the microphones used in operation 5 is played back into the headphones of all four dancers. They perform simultaneous solos responding to a score the audience does not hear.

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7. The recording from the other microphone used in operation 5 becomes the starting point for another manifestation, to begin immediately or at another point in time…
The Endless.